Lightning Experience

  • Winter ’20 Release brings new Salesforce Mobile App

    While not the most obvious of changes when reading the release notes, behind the scenes Winter ’20 Release brings new Salesforce Mobile App which aligns the mobile experience with Lightning Experience on desktop. Let’s take a quick look at what you can expect, and how to make the transition a smooth one for your users.

    Why the change?

    The short answer is, that Salesforce1 (or Salesforce Mobile) hasn’t changed much since it was released in late 2014.

    The slightly longer answer though adds a bit more nuance. After Salesforce1 brought in a new way of navigation and accessing your data, Salesforce then turned its focus to building out a new desktop experience, which ultimately led to Lightning Experience.

    Before this, users were able to use the Salesforce1 app via their desktop instead of using what is now referred to as Salesforce ‘Classic’ UI. The main benefit of this was to test how something would look on Mobile or to use it via browser on an iPad or similar device.

    But with Lightning Experience, Salesforce has had its hands full migrating all products and features over, and ensuring improvements were delivered. Certain elements were similar across mobile and desktop now, so there wasn’t a huge need to update/refresh.

    That was until late last year, when Salesforce and Apple announced a strategic partnership. With the partnership aiming to integrate voice commands (ie Siri) with Salesforce Mobile and rollout a Salesforce SDK for developers, which integrates with Swift (the preferred programming language on Apple devices).

    Introducing the new Salesforce Mobile App

    And so, here we are – with a new Salesforce Mobile App heading our way.

    The primary focus of the app appears to integrate the mobile vs desktop experiences further. This will allow for more admin control over what is made available to users, with mobile navigation introducing the App Launcher:

    A Lightning app's desktop navigation items are reflected in the mobile app
    App Launcher coming soon to new Salesforce Mobile App.

    Key improvements to navigation:

    • Navigation Bar at the bottom of screen will now feature Favourites, Search and Notifications . This is a change from the global / quick actions.
    • App Launcher finally appears on Salesforce Mobile. Allowing users to select standard/custom apps, and display the related tabs.
    • Personalisation of Nav Bar, will be reflected for users on Lightning Experience (aka Desktop) and Mobile App.

    What other changes are coming?

    Changes to Page Layouts are also included, and now the same page will display for Lightning Experience or Mobile App. Admins will only need to create one page now.

    What does this mean in the real world? It means you will have control to hide components which don’t make sense on either desktop or mobile experience.

    Voice Commands

    “Hey Siri, show me my dashboard.” and now Siri will actually listen… With the new Salesforce Mobile App opening up your dashboard page.

    The new Salesforce Mobile App will also (and obviously) tie into the recently announced Einstein Voice and Einstein Platform Services, which will allow users to dictate notes, get Einstein recommended updates, etc on Apple/Google/Alexa devices.

    What do you need to do?

    This new mobile experience is opt-in, so even if users get the new mobile app – from the App Store/Play Store – without the new permissions, they will not experience any changes.

    Salesforce has given control to admins to prepare for the transition, similar to Lightning Experience Transition.

    From a high level, Salesforce recommend the following steps:

    When will the new app be available?

    This should become available globally, starting from October 14th 2019. Users will

    Additionally the new User Permissions will be available as part of Winter ’20 release, which should be rolled out globally (for majority of orgs) by the 14th October.

    Resources

  • What I learnt rolling out Salesforce Lightning…

    Rolling out Salesforce Lightning is something most of us have or will shortly experience.  If you are an Admin, there is fewer and fewer reasons to not take the plunge and migrate over to Salesforce Lightning.

    I have long been pushing our various Salesforce instances towards being able to migrate to Lightning Experience. 

    We had focused so much time and energy trying to reduce the technical debt to a point we could possibly make the jump.  Until we made the decision to shift gears, and actually move into a shiny new org.

    But moving to Lightning, has taught me a few things as an admin/dev, and it is time to share!  So here are some musings/lessons/thoughts about rolling out Salesforce Lightning…

    Learn Lightning, inside and out! 

    I got to say, there was plenty of things that stumped me about the move across to Lightning.

    One that ALWAYS got me, was the difference between the Lightning Page Builder, the ‘normal’ page layout builder and what controls what on the actual overall layout in Lightning.

    Simplest way to learn this, is imagine the Lightning Page as the top layer, or shell, which allows you to organise the overall feel of a specific page in Lightning.

    Lightning page regions 

    • This is where you define how many columns you want to display, how where the columns/rows go.
    • It is also where you control what displays where.  And groups together things like record pages (ie the ‘normal page layout’), any widgets or components you want.
    • This is where you can control the sub-tabs which display in Lightning.  Like the Related sub-tab or Chatter/Activities

    Adding a Component to a Tab

    The thing that got me, the most when starting out? 

    This is NOT where you control the buttons, quick actions, etc visible on the page.  For that you still need to go and edit the Record Page.

    I don’t know why, but this is one thing that really irritated me the most until it finally just ‘clicked’ and made sense in my head.

    The section on the Record Page Layout for ‘Salesforce Mobile and Lightning Experience Actions’ is where you control this.

    But remember, you may have a Lightning page for all users.  But if you have a Record Page Layout for different profiles/record types, then you will have multiple places to manage this and make sure it is correct for everyone.

    Lightning is about speed and efficiency, so use it!

    So use the opportunity of moving to Lightning as a way to change how your processes work. If you are migrating to Lightning, you will have to review most (if not all) processes anyway. So use this as an opportunity to work with your internal stakeholders and improve the workflow for the end-users!

    Going through our transformation to Lightning, there was a ‘hit list’ of things we wanted to change.

    Depending on your scope re: the project and time allowed, you won’t hit everything. But by identifying and prioritising the ‘top speed boosters’ for your end-users, helps get them engaged in the overall project. And by even improving their workflow by reducing 3 or 4 clicks, you would be surprised how quickly this all adds up to measurable improvement for your users.

    Even reworking your page layouts, to display the information the end-user needs can add to the overall benefit of Lightning.

    Why is this important?

    Rolling out Salesforce Lightning, as a new User Interface, gives you a lot of flexibility. So the more you can do in this area, helps when it comes time to rolling out the new system and getting your users to buy-in and actually use Lightning!

    It all ties back into driving engagement and adoption. Which is the reason you are doing this change in the first place, isn’t it?

    It is a bigger jump for your dev team than you may realise…

    Through this project, I had the benefit of working with a number of top notch dev teams, but specifically the Salesforce dev team.

    But changing from Classic to Lightning, had a massive up-skilling implication for us as a company. And we ensured we gave the development team time to learn the ropes with Lightning Pages/Components/etc.

    To help out, we also tried to go as ‘out of the box’ as possible. But no matter how hard you push for this, there are likely to be business rules which need customisations.

    So don’t underestimate this!

    Allow your dev team time before the migration to up-skill and learn about how the new Lightning framework fits together.

    I would always loved to give our dev team more time for this, but keep in mind that you do have to try and balance this with likely delivery ‘windows’ within your organisation.

    We had a lot of other projects happening, both before and after this porject. So we had a specific time frame we had to aim for to release in. But we made it, and I think we managed to get a decent amount of time for our devs to learn the new world.

    Think about the data!

    As previously mentioned, we made a decision that it would be easier for the teams involved to deliver Lightning to the business as part of a new CRM. This was instead of the option to try and update/upgrade things in a Salesforce org that was around 12-14years old!

    For us, though this meant we also had to plan in a CRM Data Migration… YAY!

    Image result for data

    Now, you might not have the need to go this route. But data is still very important in the project.

    What data is visible, can in some circumstances be controlled by Lightning. Do you use Customisable Forecasts? Nope not Lightning compatible, instead you will need Collaborative Forecasts. Salesforce have done a massive job in trying to plug all the gaps between classic and Lightning, but some still exist. (Like Close Date showing in US Date format, regardless of locale settings – very confusing everywhere that isn’t US/Canada!)

    So, remember the data.

    Remember what you need your users to do in Lightning, and make sure they still can do it.

    It could be simple tweaks to page layouts (as per my first point). But you need to make sure everything that is needed, is visible to those who need it.

    And where there are system or feature differences, weigh up does the Lightning alternative work for you? And if yes, what training/coaching do users need to get used to the new way of working? Then this should feed into your overall training plan, as remember, Lightning is very different for end-users!

    Remember your Users (aka avoid the Bambi effect!)

    Any change of this nature is going to be big! As admins and developers, we have now been conditioned re ‘all things Lightning’. And have been for a number of years – even if you haven’t used it before yourself.

    Everything Salesforce related has been pushing Lightning now for a number of years…

    But the biggest thing here is, don’t underestimate the change for your end-users. Remember this will mostly be brand new to them. And some will likely resist the move, at first…

    One anecdote for you, which was something that I had to fight hard against myself. Don’t underestimate the impacts of some of the ‘out of the box’ features that come with Lightning. Remember as Salesforce users we have seen things like Kanban and Lightning Consoles in every Salesforce demo and feature release now for a number of years…

    And this is how you want to ensure you avoid your end-users becoming like the proverbial ‘deer in the headlights’ (aka Bambi).

    Image result for bambi headlight
    Oh look, new features!

    When we rolled out Salesforce Lightning, our sales and finances team LOVED Kanban View on their relevant list views. But it was something that was easy for the delivery team to skip over or avoid, because for us we had seen it all before, and it wasn’t part of what we were actually developing…

    But we didn’t deliver that as a feature… Or did we?!

    Sometimes the project team got a little disheartened, myself included. Why? Because the meetings you go to with end users, they would always say how ‘we love these things’, but those were the Salesforce Lightning ‘out of the box’ features, like Kanban.

    But to make those features work and work properly for your teams, there is a lot of effort that is needed to ensure they work as expected. You have to adjust all the things that go on ‘inside’ Salesforce, in the places end-users don’t really see! Like your workflows and validation rules. These things simply have to be in-sync with what you are trying to deliver with Lightning.

    So we might not have created Kanban, but we did everything behind the scenes that makes it work fluidly/’drag and drop’ in a system. We updated the workflows, approval rules and validation rules behind the scenes to allow users to be able to ‘simply drag and drop’ records into the new status.

    In the old classic workflow, we would just throw up a validation error (not best practise, but so many orgs do this), if something was missing. But now moving to Lightning, this gave us a huge opportunity to rethink how/when certain information got entered in Salesforce.

    Rolling out Salesforce Lightning? Engage the top brass, and the foot soldiers

    A project on this scale, will need so many different people to be involved.

    Success is paramount on engaging the top brass (ie senior leaders/stakeholders) and getting them involved in the process. And likewise, you have to also get the foot soldiers (or your super users) comfortable enough to be able to help take some of the questions.

    We treated this as much of a culture change, as it was a system change. And that seemed to work really well for the project.

    There are a lot of ways to do this, and you can search until the cows come home about Change Management practices. But put simply you and your team will need allies and generals. People on your side to help push your message across the teams / organisation and drive adoption.

    And the biggest lesson here, is to remember that everyone reacts to change differently. Doesn’t matter what it is.

    But by treating this like a cultural change, and preparing to support people as they went through the ‘change curve‘, you can help ‘short circuit’ the pain of change. You won’t get rid of it completely, but you can come up with a plan that helps people transition through to the ‘new way’ as quickly as possible.

    Rolling out Salesforce Lightning is like any change.  Here is a Change Management curve
    Rolling out Salesforce Lightning, can impact people differently. The ‘change curve’ highlights a number of outcomes…

    And finally…

    There is a lot to go through. The key to success really is to plan. I have touched on a number of facets to what we learned as part of our Lightning migration. Everyone has a different starting point, both re: Salesforce instance but also experience with driving changes within an organisation.

    Planning your project will put you in good stead, and by scheduling in the change on your roadmap, you can use it as a golden opportunity to revisit almost everything to do with how Salesforce works at your organisation.

    As part of this revisit, decide what are the must-haves and things that need to change, versus the nice-to-haves. And also use this as a chance to try to identify any risks to the project.

    But don’t just focus on ‘must-haves’. Sometimes the nice-to-haves are the things that also help you get people excited about a new system…

    Comments below!

    Have you recently moved across to Lightning? What are your tips or lessons for moving to Lightning?

    Or if you are planning on moving to Lightning, what are the things you are most looking forward to (or nervous about)?

  • Spring ’19 Release for Admins

    And welcome to 2019! Just like that, we have started the new year and are about to hit the ground running with a new Salesforce release just around the corner. Salesforce’s Spring ’19 Release is just around the corner…

    First up, apologies for the lateness of the post… It has been a busy few months for me, but I will talk about that in another post shortly.

    As usual, we will take a look at what this release has in store and focus specifically on key features of the release which apply to Sales and Service Cloud users.

    Lightning Flow Builder (retiring of Cloud Flow Designer)

    Salesforce's new Flow Builder
    The new Flow Builder… Coming soon!

    Spring ’19 release will see the introduction of the new Lightning Flow Builder. This will update the UI for Flow Designer, making it HTML5 compatible. What this ultimately means, is no more clunky Flash based Cloud Flow Builder.

    Particularly, no more annoying prompts to update Adobe Flash in Chrome every 5 minutes! Which is what I think I am most excited about!

    Also things have been simplified. No more deciding what type of update/query you want. Do you want a ‘Fast Create’ or a ‘Record Create’?! Well, you don’t need to think about this anymore, as there is now just ‘Create’. Also variables and

    You will get this by default, but if you need to switch back to Cloud Flow Designer (aka ‘the old one’) you will be able to.

    Also if you use Flow and External Objects, things are about to become so much easier for data manipulation. With Flows being supported on External Objects.

    More data…  Sort of.

    Salesforce is finally, updating the base data storage each org gets. From a measly 1GB to a slightly less measly 10GB.

    Of course, you would take the increase. But seriously, in this day and age of Google/Microsoft/AWS offering 1TB or above on generic subscriptions… Why, oh why, is this only 10GB!?

    I know I should be grateful, but this has been a bug bear of mine for years now!

    Lightning Experience, take note…

    There are a number of tweaks and improvements in this release, as always, for things Lightning.

    But one thing you need to be aware of. Salesforce have finally waved the yellow flag to let users know that Lightning Experience will become the ‘default’ user experience for your users who have the Lightning Experience permission on their profile (or permission set), or any user on a Standard profile within Salesforce.

    These users will then also get moved to

    This is now a critical update, and will auto-activate as part of the Winter ‘20 release.

    So better get planning now! Check out the FAQ to get more answers about this upcoming change and who it will impact.

    Pin the List View you actually want!

    I think this was the biggest complaint we had when we switched users to Lightning: “why is ‘Recently Viewed’ always the view I get?”

    Well fret no more end-users!

    Salesforce Spring ’19 release now comes with added ‘pin-able’ List Views!

    So now you can Pin a List View to make it the default list view. Or you can Favourite a list view, or add a list view as a favourite tab… So your users have three ways to get to the view that they want now!!!

    Transferring Owner of an Account?

    Now you can move more of the related records to the new owner, in one quick action in Lightning… Saving Admins (or who ever transfers accounts) so much time!!!

    Service Cloud, hasn’t been forgotten…

    There are a number of additions to the way Service Cloud and Lightning work better together. But overall most of the additions seem for the Field Service package.

    Lightning Knowledge Migration Tool

    To help streamline the transfer to Lightning for service cloud users, and to encourage people to stay on the default / generic Salesforce objects. The Migration Tool will now be able to help migrate Knowledge from Classic to Lightning.

    Other Service Cloud improvements

    You can see find a list of the general improvements being made as part of this release, here.

    Most of the items include the changes to flow and processes for Service, or improvements to Omni-Channel in Lightning supporting new service channels. Or the new calendar scheduling feature, but that also applies across the other clouds too…

    When will I get Spring ’19 Release?

    Some server instances have already received the Spring ’19 release from Salesforce. A handful of NAxx Server instances…

    But for the rest of the world, the next two release windows are:

    • February 2nd 2019
    • February 9th 2019

    To find out when your instance will be upgrade:

    • please go to https://status.salesforce.com
    • in the search box, enter your server instance or custom domain
    • click on ‘Instances’
    • then on the following page, click ‘Maintenances’
    • user the Quick Find to locate ‘Spring ’19 Major Release’

    Here is an example of the calendar for the EU12 instance:

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